CEU Introduction: Sentence Production Treatments for Aphasia The production of spoken language to convey information about states and events is a uniquely human ability. By stringing words together we are able to express our thoughts and feelings and communicate with each other. In order to express ideas beyond the level of simply labeling, we need to understand ... SIG News
SIG News  |   October 01, 2001
CEU Introduction: Sentence Production Treatments for Aphasia
Author Notes
Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   October 01, 2001
CEU Introduction: Sentence Production Treatments for Aphasia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2001, Vol. 11, 3. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.3.3
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2001, Vol. 11, 3. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.3.3
The production of spoken language to convey information about states and events is a uniquely human ability. By stringing words together we are able to express our thoughts and feelings and communicate with each other. In order to express ideas beyond the level of simply labeling, we need to understand how words relate to each other and can be combined; that is, we need to know about grammar. For most of us, this knowledge is acquired relatively painlessly (with apologies to Sr. Eugenia at St. Margaret’s Parish School) and is utilized without much conscious awareness. Words are readily retrieved and combined into sentences, easily modified with respect to tense, case, and sentence format as the situation calls for, and produced with accurate rate and prosody to reflect the intended meaning. However, in individuals with aphasia, where the ease of fluent sentence production is often abruptly disrupted, the ability to formulate even a simple utterance can pose an enormous challenge. For many of these individuals, verbal communication is challenged by difficulty processing the grammatical functions that support the construction of formal language, often referred to as agrammatism. This issue of the Division 2 Newsletter focuses on grammatical impairments associated with aphasia, with special attention to how evidence from research can be used to inform treatment.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.