Semantic Feature Analysis: The Evidence for Treating Lexical Impairments in Aphasia Impairment of the ability to retrieve and produce words is a common symptom of aphasia, although the severity varies and its manifestation can range from a brief pause in speech to a complete halt in the flow of discourse. Most studies that have investigated methods to improve lexical retrieval impairment ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2001
Semantic Feature Analysis: The Evidence for Treating Lexical Impairments in Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Boyle
    Montclair State University, Upper Montclair, NJ
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2001
Semantic Feature Analysis: The Evidence for Treating Lexical Impairments in Aphasia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2001, Vol. 11, 23-28. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.2.23
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2001, Vol. 11, 23-28. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.2.23
Impairment of the ability to retrieve and produce words is a common symptom of aphasia, although the severity varies and its manifestation can range from a brief pause in speech to a complete halt in the flow of discourse. Most studies that have investigated methods to improve lexical retrieval impairment have focused on performance in confrontation picture naming tasks. Although one can argue that naming pictures has little pragmatic value (Brookshire, 1997), sometimes it is easier to work on lexical retrieval in the context of confrontation picture naming than to work at a discourse level. For example, Shewan and Bandur (1986)  stated that the focus of treatment for lexical impairment should be on “determining what cues or strategies help the client, increasing awareness of effective cues, and increasing their use” (p. 175). The target is known in a picture naming task, which is not always the case in discourse. Knowledge of the target makes it easier to gauge the accuracy of responses and the success of cues or strategies, so that confrontation picture naming sometimes provides the clinician with advantages that discourse level work does not.
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