Acute Ischemic Stroke: Current Treatment and Future Direction Stroke is a very complex disease encompassing several conditions, such as cerebral ischemia, in-tracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States, affecting more than 500,000 individuals every year, and carrying a mortality rate of 30% (Broderick et al., 1998). ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2000
Acute Ischemic Stroke: Current Treatment and Future Direction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jose I. Suarez
    Neurosciences Critical Care, University Hospitals of Cleveland and Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
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Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2000
Acute Ischemic Stroke: Current Treatment and Future Direction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2000, Vol. 10, 5-11. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.4.5
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2000, Vol. 10, 5-11. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.4.5
Stroke is a very complex disease encompassing several conditions, such as cerebral ischemia, in-tracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States, affecting more than 500,000 individuals every year, and carrying a mortality rate of 30% (Broderick et al., 1998). The human and economic costs associated with stroke are enormous, with more than a 50% incidence of disability in survivors, the highest among all medical conditions affecting mankind. In this article, I will review the state-of-the-art in treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke.
Acute ischemic stroke can be defined as an injury to any central nervous system structure resulting from a lack or inadequate supply of cerebral blood flow (CBF). If this low CBF state is maintained for a sufficiently long period of time, brain cells will experience irreversible damage that will lead to their death. The main goal of treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke is the restoration of normal CBF before such irreversible changes occur. However, I would like to emphasize that correction of modifiable risk factors for acute is-chemic stroke (Table 1) is one of the most important tasks that health care providers should undertake if we are to reduce the incidence of this terrible disease.
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