Interview With Nancy Helm-Estabrooks, Recipient of the 2000 Honors of the Association There I was in my advisor’s office (in the Speech and Drama Department at the University of Massachusetts), discussing my choice of a “major” when my mother’s voice started ringing in my ears saying “It doesn’t matter that you had the lead in Our Town. You can’t make a ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2000
Interview With Nancy Helm-Estabrooks, Recipient of the 2000 Honors of the Association
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Article   |   December 01, 2000
Interview With Nancy Helm-Estabrooks, Recipient of the 2000 Honors of the Association
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2000, Vol. 10, 3-4. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.4.3
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2000, Vol. 10, 3-4. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.4.3
There I was in my advisor’s office (in the Speech and Drama Department at the University of Massachusetts), discussing my choice of a “major” when my mother’s voice started ringing in my ears saying “It doesn’t matter that you had the lead in Our Town. You can’t make a living as an actress. You can’t sing or dance. Get a profession!” Suddenly, I had visions of roaming the streets of New York in rags, trying to break into show biz. But if not acting, what profession? This was 1960. Women tended to be nurses or teachers. I fainted at the sight of blood, and I never did like school—just the extracurricular activities.
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