Technology in the Treatment of Language Disorders: Introduction This issue of the Division 2 Newsletter focuses on the role of technology in treating persons with language disorders, particularly aphasia. Three very different approaches are presented. One message I would like to emphasize for the readers is that each clinician must carefully evaluate any program of treatment and be ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2000
Technology in the Treatment of Language Disorders: Introduction
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  • Don RobinIssue Editor
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Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2000
Technology in the Treatment of Language Disorders: Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2000, Vol. 10, 6. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.1.6-a
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2000, Vol. 10, 6. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.1.6-a
This issue of the Division 2 Newsletter focuses on the role of technology in treating persons with language disorders, particularly aphasia. Three very different approaches are presented. One message I would like to emphasize for the readers is that each clinician must carefully evaluate any program of treatment and be a careful consumer. I urge you to do the same with the programs presented here. For instance, whether or not the program has received support, you, the clinician, must carefully evaluate its utility for a given client. You should always keep in mind that most programs are not for every client you see with language disorders. You should be well aware of efficacy data, or the lack thereof, when deciding about using a treatment program. You must be able to evaluate whether the efficacy data come from a carefully controlled study, so that you can be reasonably sure the effects reported are actually the result of the treatment. Typically, pre- and post-treatment designs are not as informative as single subject designs (though there are a number of noteworthy exceptions in the literature). You should evaluate the theoretical underpinnings of the approaches, if applicable. In other words, I would urge each of you to take nothing at face value and to critically evaluate the programs you encounter, so you can make informed decisions about which treatment(s) to use with a given patient. A helpful discussion of how to evaluate treatment programs can be viewed under FAQs in the speech-language pathology section of the ASHA Web site.
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