The Role of Computers in the Treatment of People With Aphasia: Reflections on the Past 20 Years I was born in the first half of the last century, when computers were large room-sized boxes made from sheets of metal, containing miles of cables, clicking mechanical relays, and decorated with blinking lights and spinning wheels of half-inch magnetic tape. They were big and expensive and, like the computer ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2000
The Role of Computers in the Treatment of People With Aphasia: Reflections on the Past 20 Years
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard C. Katz
    Carl T. Hayden VA Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ
    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2000
The Role of Computers in the Treatment of People With Aphasia: Reflections on the Past 20 Years
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2000, Vol. 10, 6-10. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.1.6
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2000, Vol. 10, 6-10. doi:10.1044/nnsld10.1.6
I was born in the first half of the last century, when computers were large room-sized boxes made from sheets of metal, containing miles of cables, clicking mechanical relays, and decorated with blinking lights and spinning wheels of half-inch magnetic tape. They were big and expensive and, like the computer clergy that controlled them, mysterious, inflexible, and unfriendly. In spite of the best efforts of the military industrial complex to build bigger and more expensive computers, technology took a sharp left and today personal computers (PCs) are available to anyone with a library card or an AC outlet. PCs are affordable and appealing to practically anyone who might benefit from using a computer. Many computers talk, some even listen, and most let you communicate using printed words, still pictures, and, in some situations, voice and video with anyone with access to a computer, fax, telephone, cell phone, text pager, or a personal digital assistant (such as the Palm Pilot®). Computers even come in colors like raspberry red and blueberry blue.
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